great expectations

Musing Mondays (July 9)

This week’s Musing Mondays from Should Be Reading asks…

“This week’s musing asks…

Have you ever read a book that, at the time, you didn’t feel a strong connection towards, but as time goes by you find yourself thinking about it a lot?

This doesn’t happen to me too often. If I can’t connect to a book the first time, there is a chance I might never connect with it at all.

The exact opposite has happened more than once. I use to like a particular book but as time went by I started disliking it. This happened with two of George Bernard Shaw’s plays Arms and the Man and You Never Can Tell. I used to like them but now they just irritate me.

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens is a book I’ve grown fonder of over the years. I did like it when I read it the first time some eight years ago. But today as a (hopefully!) more matured individual I understand and love the book much better.

Quote It Saturday

Quote It Saturday is hosted at Freda’s Voice.

Add as many quotes as you wish, from whom ever you wish. It can even be lyrics to a song.
Just tell us who it is. Anonymous welcome too.
Don’t forget to Link up at Freda’s site.

Today’s Quotes are about happiness or lack thereof.

And still I stood looking at the house, thinking how happy I should be if I lived there with her, and knowing that I never was happy with her, but always miserable. ~ Charles Dickens from Great Expectations

* It’s so hard to forget pain, but it’s even harder to remember sweetness. We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace. ~ Chuck Palahniuk from Diary

* Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know. ~ Ernest Hemingway from The Garden of Eden

Quote It Saturday

Quote It Saturday is hosted at Freda’s Voice.

Add as many quotes as you wish, from whom ever you wish. It can even be lyrics to a song.
Just tell us who it is. Anonymous welcome too.
Don’t forget to Link up at Freda’s site.

*  …throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.

* Mrs. Joe was a very clean housekeeper, but had an exquisite art of making her cleanliness more uncomfortable and unacceptable than dirt itself. Cleanliness is next to Godliness, and some people do the same by their religion.

~ Charles Dickens from Great Expectations

Booking Through Thursday: Pet Names

This week’s Booking Through Thursday asks:

“Do you have any pet that has a name inspired by your readings?

If not, what would you pick if you DID?

Do any of your friends have book-based names for their pets? (Or their children?)”

I do not have a pet. If I had one it would have to be a cat as I am a cat person. I think I would name it after Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights or Pip from Great Expectations.

I don’t know of anyone giving their children book based names. I have heard that one of my mom’s great uncles fell in love with his wife because her name was the same as one of his favourite literary heroines.

January – Charles Dickens Month: Dickens and Collins

7th February 2012 is the 200th birthday of Charles Dickens. To mark the occasion Amanda at Fig and Thistle is hosting January – Charles Dickens Month. As Charles Dickens is one of my favourite authors, I couldn’t resist plunging into it.

Today’s post is about Dickens and CollinsCharles Dickens and Wilkie Collins, contemporaries, friends and authors whom I enjoy reading.

*These are my personal opinions. No offence is meant to anyone.*

Comparisons between Charles dickens and Wilkie Collins are inevitable. They were contemporaries and very close friends. As a big fan of Victorian Literature, I have read both with deep enthusiasm.

I personally feel that Collins was sometimes less sure about what he wanted to do. For example, in The Moonstone he came across as a bit  preachy. At times his social commentary overburdened his narrative and sometimes the light, entertaining side took over more completely. It’s like a play of shadow and light. On the other hand, when Collins set out to entertain, without trying to provide any social commentary, he was superb! I absolutely adore his The Queen of Hearts!

Dickens seemed much more confident about how he wanted to deal with the issues important to him (child labour, the condition of prisons, the judiciary system etc, etc,) and how and when to entertain.  For example, his Great Expectations, where the sadness of Pip’s situation is enlivened by a few interludes such as the scenes at Mr. Wopsle’s great aunt’s school and Mr. Wemmick’s division of his personal and professional life. But one side never overshadowed the other.

With Dickens the characters are such a big part of the plots that long after the book is over one remembers their personalities. How can I forget Sydney Carton from A Tale of Two Cities or even someone like Mrs Lirriper from Mrs Lirriper’s Lodgings? Some of  Collins’s characters are memorable (Count Fosco from The Woman in White comes to mind) but many seem kind of undermined by the main story. I often forget the names of the male and female lead of  The Moonstone.

For me, Dickens is superior of the two at least in these two aspects.