roald dahl

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl was published in the US by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. in 1964 and in the UK by George Allen & Unwin in 1967.

The story of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory revolves around little Charlie Bucket and his trip to the mysterious Mr. Willy Wonka’s amazing chocolate factory.

The book is extremely short. I finished it in about an hour.

I loved Charlie and his unusual family. Grandpa Joe is especially lovable.

All the chocolates in the book sound delicious! I wish at least some of them were real.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has been adapted for the screen twice. First in 1971 as Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory and in 2005 as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. I have watched the 2005 Johnny Depp version of it. Although the plot of the 2005 version differs to a certain extent from the book, the movie version was very enjoyable.

Some of Mr. Wonka’s remarks are very funny. I laughed out loud at certain parts,

‘Whips!’ cried Veruca Salt. ‘What on earth do you use whips for?’

‘For whipping cream, of course,’ said Mr Wonka. ‘How can you whip cream without whips? Whipped cream isn’t whipped cream at all unless it’s been whipped with whips. Just as a poached egg isn’t a poached egg unless it’s been stolen from the woods in the dead of night!’

I liked the illustrations by Quentin Blake. They fit Dahl’s story perfectly. No wonder they collaborated for so many years.

I liked reading Charlie and the Chocolate Factory but I have my reservations about the book. All of the naughty children get their comeuppance seemingly by ‘accident’, accidents which were rather nasty at times, the Oompa-Loompas obvious joy at the accidents and their songs about those accidents, all of this is frankly disturbing.

I read Roald Dahl’s The Great Automatic Grammatizator and Other Stories, an adult short story collection, last year and found that Dahl’s vision can often be very dark. Even in a juvenile fiction book like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory I can see darker undertones. Overall, I enjoyed the book but I just can’t help but get uneasy at some of Dahl’s rather wicked sense of humour.

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The Friday 56

The Friday 56 is a bookish meme hosted by Freda’s Voice.

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56.
*Find any sentence that grabs you.
*Post it.
*Link up at Freda’s site

Today’s sentence comes from Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

“Slowly but surely, everybody in the house began to starve.”

Not a line one would expect from a book like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, is it?

Teaser Tuesdays (July 12)

Teaser Tuesdays asks us to:

Grab our current read

Open to a random page

Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page

Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like our teaser!
 
My Teaser:

“‘Whips!’ cried Veruca Salt. ‘What on earth do you use whips for?’

‘For whipping cream, of course,’ said Mr Wonka. ‘How can you whip cream without whips? Whipped cream isn’t whipped cream at all unless it’s been whipped with whips. Just as a poached egg isn’t a poached egg unless it’s been stolen from the woods in the dead of night!”

p. 112, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl.

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading.

Welcome Home: Books that Arrived in June 2011

“It is what you read when you don’t have to that determines what you will be when you can’t help it.” – Oscar Wilde

One of my colleagues blenched at the sight of me reading a book, wondering that I still had energy to read a non-academic book after a rather busy work day. How can I make an ‘educated’ woman like her understand that there is a difference between reading for work and reading for pleasure? And besides, I think I’ll actually die if I don’t get to read something for pleasure!

So, here are a few books I bought in the month of June solely for my own ‘pleasure’ .

June 8, 2011

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Roald Dahl.

Anne of Green Gables. L. M. Montgomery.

Rebecca. Daphne Du Maurier.

A Short History of Nearly Everything. Bill Bryson.

Seasonal Adjustments. Adib Khan.

           

First up two books I missed out on reading as a kid, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Anne of Green Gables. Looking forward to both, especially to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, as I liked the movie version starring Johnny Depp.

Even though I have read Rebecca before, I didn’t have the book in my own collection. This is one book that I just had to have for my own library.

I have heard a lot of good things about Bill Bryson but have never read anything by him. A Short History of Nearly Everything seems like a good place to start.

Finally, after I had finished my browsing and buying,  the book store owner gave me a complementary copy of a book called Seasonal Adjustments. Apparently it had won Australia’s NSW State Literary Award in 1994 and the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book in 1995. This is not my usual reading material but a free book is a free book.