the thirty-nine steps

Musing Mondays (Dec.10)

Musing Mondays 5

This week’s Musing Mondays from Should Be Reading asks…

“This week’s musing, courtesy of  “iamciska.tumbler.com“,asks…

What was the last book you could not finish and why?”

I usually finish any book I start, no matter how appalling the book is.

On the rare occasions when I do give up on a book, I mainly give it up if it is longwinded, if the story goes nowhere and I fail to see the purpose of it all.

The last time I gave up on a book was about a year ago. It was The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers. The story even after 113 pages was going nowhere. The narrative was way too full of maritime details for my understanding. Descriptions of tides and sand banks and what not! It was supposed to be a spy thriller in the vein of John Buchan’s The Thirty-Nine Steps, one of my all time favourites, but sadly it turned out to be a dud. It was so boring! Nothing at all like The Thirty-Nine Steps.

The Friday 56

The Friday 56 is a bookish meme hosted by Freda’s Voice.

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56.
*Find any sentence that grabs you.
*Post it.
*Link up at Freda’s site

Today’s sentence comes from The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan.

“I lay and tortured myself – for the ginger biscuits merely emphasized the aching void – with the memory of all the good food I had thought so little of in London.”

The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan

The Thirty-Nine Steps is a thriller set just before the start of the First World War. Written by the Scottish author John Buchan, it first appeared as a serial in Blackwood’s Magazine in 1915. It was published in book form the same year by William Blackwood and Sons, Edinburgh.

The Thirty-Nine Steps chronicles the adventures of Richard Hannay, an expatriate British man, who finds himself embroiled in an international conspiracy after his friend and neighbour Franklin Scudder is found murdered in his apartment. This book is possibly one of the first examples of the innocent man on the run thrillers.

I find The Thirty-Nine Steps highly entertaining. It is one of those books that do not require a lot of thought but is not entirely a frivolous piece of fluff either.

The narrative moves at such a furious pace that there is hardly any time to breath. It is action packed with a great many things happening one after another. This is especially true when Hannay is on the run from both the police and a band of ruthless criminals and is trying to hide in rural Scotland.

The narrative does require a certain amount of suspension of disbelief. But Buchan manages to successfully keep the narrative ‘just’ within the bounds of reality.

Parts of the narrative appear a bit dated.

I enjoy John Buchan’s writing. It’s crisp and tautly paced.

This is a very, very short book. My Wordsworth Classics edition of the book is just 115 pages long. There is not really a lot of time for character development. Richard Hannay as the protagonist and the narrator remains the focus most of the time. So, it is mainly his character that we get to know fully. But even in this short space Buchan manages to portray the villains quite successfully. They are pretty sinister, as they are meant to be.

This book has been adapted for the screen a number of times, most notably in 1935 by Alfred Hitchcock. But most of these big screen adaptations have not remained faithful to the original work. For example, the phrase The Thirty-Nine Steps differs in its meaning in almost each of the film versions. Also, most of the movies introduce a love angle that is not a part of the original story.

The final few pages of the book are quite strange. Not really what is generally expected from a book of this genre. The atmosphere alone makes the climax very intense.

The Thirty-Nine Steps is one of my bona fide comfort reads. It manages to entertain me and at the same time dose not feel like a guilty pleasure. Overall, very enjoyable.

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30 Day Book Challenge

Day 10: Shortest Book I’ve Read

The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan.

I think The Thirty-Nine Steps is the shortest book I’ve ever read. My Wordsworth Classics edition is just 115 pages long.

Due to its short length, there is not really a lot of time for character development. Richard Hannay, the protagonist, remains the focus most of the time. So, it is mainly his character that we get to know fully. But even in this short space Buchan manages to portray the villains quite successfully. They are pretty sinister, as they are meant to be. I really enjoyed this classic innocent man on the run thriller.